Twill Weave of Denim

Part of denim that also important is a webbing from that denim. Usually denim is made from tightly woven fabric from cotton warp yarn and white cotton filling yarn. The filling yarns are stretched across the width of the fabric and interlaced at a 90 degree angle with warp yarns. Interwoven pattern of diagonal lines from that process called “twill weave”. But, nowadays denim not only made from twill weave, but also another weave, like plain weave and satin weave. We will share to you about that, here you go!

Right hand twill, also know as “z twill”, was made famous as Levi’s jeans standard fabric and now is the most common twill weave used for denim fabrics. Right hand twill can be recognized by the upward direction of the diagonal twill on the face of the fabric as it runs from lower left toward upper right. Right hand twill is known to have a flatter and smoother surface compared to other twill fabrics.

source: heddels.com

Left hand twill, also known as “s twill”, is a weave in which the grain line runs from the top-left hand corner of the fabric to the bottom right which is the opposite of right hand twill. It was originally used by Lee denim as its basic denim. Left hand twill tends to wear down softer than right hand twill and thus a softer hand feel after washing. Left hand twill will also have different wear patterns as the fabric can emphasize streakiness or vertical fading.

source: heddels.com

Broken twill denim was first used by Wrangler in 1964 as a way to combat the twisting effect characteristic of regular twill denim (at the time considered a “fault” by many). Traditionally, twill is woven either to the right hand or the left hand as we described above which will eventually twist itself after washing due to the tension. This is why you see the outseam of some denim twisted to the front or back of the leg. Broken twill avoids this. Instead of the twill running left or right, broken twill contains no distinct direction and instead alternates right and left – the end effect resembles a random zigzag pattern as shown down below.

source: heddels.com

The satin weave is distinguished by its lustrous, or ‘silky’, appearance. Satin describes the way the threads are combined, and the yarn used may be silk or polyester, among others, giving different fabrics. The satin weave is characterized by four or more cool fill or weft yarns floating over a warp yarn or vice versa, four warp yarns floating over a single weft yarn. This explains the even sheen, as unlike in other weaves, the light reflecting is not scattered as much by the fibres, which have fewer tucks.

source: indiamart.com

Plain weave is a simple way of saying a 1×1 weave. The warp and weft are aligned so that they form a simple criss-cross pattern. This method is the most simple way for cloth to be woven, as well as one of the cheapest.

source: linkedin.com

source: blueowlworkshop.blogspot.com, lookingforwardmaternity.com.

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